Rock Health News

 

3 things we discovered while making the Spire Apple Watch App

Jonathan Palley, Co-founder, Spire For the past few months we’ve been working on an App for Apple Watch. As a “wearable” that focused on tracking the 85% of your day when you are not moving and isn’t worn on the wrist, Spire is a perfect complement to the Apple Watch’s functionality. Here are 4 things we discovered while making the Spire App: 1. It’s all about notifications.  By putting notifications right on your wrist—and demanding short and quick interactions, the Apple Watch will change the conversation we have with technology. Users will not only demand higher value from notifications, but also expect the most helpful information to be immediately available to them. And this is good for the health tracking industry because it’s no longer about “tracking”. Instead, designing for the Apple Watch means tracking serves the purpose of providing interventions or other types of interactions through notifications. We know this works. Spire’s main form of interaction is through notifications (such as reminders sent to users when the device senses they are tense). We’ve seen that the more notifications Spire sends, and the more value they provide, the less interested people are in the “tracking” aspects of our product. We’ve…

3 things we discovered while making the Spire Apple Watch App

Jonathan Palley, Co-founder, Spire For the past few months we’ve been working on an App for Apple Watch. As a “wearable” that focused on tracking the 85% of your day when you are not moving and isn’t worn on the wrist, Spire is a perfect complement to the Apple Watch’s functionality. Here are 4 things we discovered while making the Spire App: 1. It’s all about notifications.  By putting notifications right on your wrist—and demanding short and quick interactions, the Apple Watch will change the conversation we have with technology. Users will not only demand higher value from notifications, but also expect the most helpful information to be immediately available to them. And this is good for the health tracking industry because it’s no longer about “tracking”. Instead, designing for the Apple Watch means tracking serves the purpose of providing interventions or other types of interactions through notifications. We know this works. Spire’s main form of interaction is through notifications (such as reminders sent to users when the device senses they are tense). We’ve seen that the more notifications Spire sends, and the more value they provide, the less interested people are in the “tracking” aspects of our product. We’ve…

How to make wearables work? Digital health coaching.

Steph Habif and Glennis Coursey Over the past five years, we’ve seen an explosion of companies working to scale digital health coaching. Rock Health specifically has seen a number of exciting announcements in 2014. In February, MyFitnessPal announced the acquisition of Sessions. Omada Health completed a Series B funding round of $23 million in April. In May, Weight Watchers acquired Wello, and Kurbo Health announced that it raised $5.8 million to “use digital health coaches to help fight childhood obesity.”

How to make wearables work? Digital health coaching.

Steph Habif and Glennis Coursey Over the past five years, we’ve seen an explosion of companies working to scale digital health coaching. Rock Health specifically has seen a number of exciting announcements in 2014. In February, MyFitnessPal announced the acquisition of Sessions. Omada Health completed a Series B funding round of $23 million in April. In May, Weight Watchers acquired Wello, and Kurbo Health announced that it raised $5.8 million to “use digital health coaches to help fight childhood obesity.”

Apple watch and activity trackers’ day of reckoning

Jonathan Palley, Co-founder and CEO, Spire Activity trackers died and were reborn on Tuesday. With the Apple Watch as well as Jawbone’s announcement that its apps will work with anyone’s hardware (which follows a similar announcement from Misfit), wearable activity tracking is no longer a product—its a feature. What’s a wearable activity tracking company to do? Jawbone and Misfit’s answer has been: platform! Wearable-donned people can use their app anywhere while the companies bring all of the user data onto their server. History is not on their side. All the great platforms in technology—from Windows, to iOS to Facebook and even to Google’s ad network—started out with a core technology/business that no one else could replicate. Then came the platform. While we can argue over which activity tracking app is best, the difference and the technology is minimal.

Apple watch and activity trackers’ day of reckoning

Jonathan Palley, Co-founder and CEO, Spire Activity trackers died and were reborn on Tuesday. With the Apple Watch as well as Jawbone’s announcement that its apps will work with anyone’s hardware (which follows a similar announcement from Misfit), wearable activity tracking is no longer a product—its a feature. What’s a wearable activity tracking company to do? Jawbone and Misfit’s answer has been: platform! Wearable-donned people can use their app anywhere while the companies bring all of the user data onto their server. History is not on their side. All the great platforms in technology—from Windows, to iOS to Facebook and even to Google’s ad network—started out with a core technology/business that no one else could replicate. Then came the platform. While we can argue over which activity tracking app is best, the difference and the technology is minimal.

Research 6/12/14

Biosensing wearables. You asked, we answered.

We had an overwhelming number of questions during the session, so here’s a rundown of all the answers we covered in our Q&A session. For more on biosensing wearables dive into the  full report and the webinar. How are biosensing wearables being supported and who is leveraging the data from those devices?  It’s largely a function of the platform companies that we outlined. Companies like Jiff & Redbrick are good examples of companies that are leveraging the data. They are working in the employer wellness space alongside health insurance companies and employers. Employees have their choice of device they bring with them to work and they get rewards and incentives for using them. Employers can leverage biosensing wearables in order to be able to track their incentive programs and have a viable source of truth for their employees biometric data.

Research 6/12/14

Biosensing wearables. You asked, we answered.

We had an overwhelming number of questions during the session, so here’s a rundown of all the answers we covered in our Q&A session. For more on biosensing wearables dive into the  full report and the webinar. How are biosensing wearables being supported and who is leveraging the data from those devices?  It’s largely a function of the platform companies that we outlined. Companies like Jiff & Redbrick are good examples of companies that are leveraging the data. They are working in the employer wellness space alongside health insurance companies and employers. Employees have their choice of device they bring with them to work and they get rewards and incentives for using them. Employers can leverage biosensing wearables in order to be able to track their incentive programs and have a viable source of truth for their employees biometric data.

Research 6/9/14

The future of biosensing wearables

This has been a year marked with pessimism about the future of biosensing wearables. We’re not buying it. For the past 15 months, Rock Health has been conducting industry research on the growing wearables and biosensors market, and we mean growing. Venture funding of biosensors and wearable technology increased 5X from 2011-2013—more than double the growth of digital health overall during the same period. The merging of these two spaces into a singular category—biosensing wearables—is where we see the most potential to impact healthcare. Today there are an overwhelming number of trending wearables, but not all of them are capable of measuring or telling us something about our health. Similarly, there are plenty of biosensors that measure physiological inputs but do not have a wearable form factor. That’s why biosensing wearables are exciting: they allow for continuous physiological monitoring in a wide range of wearable form factors.

Research 6/9/14

The future of biosensing wearables

This has been a year marked with pessimism about the future of biosensing wearables. We’re not buying it. For the past 15 months, Rock Health has been conducting industry research on the growing wearables and biosensors market, and we mean growing. Venture funding of biosensors and wearable technology increased 5X from 2011-2013—more than double the growth of digital health overall during the same period. The merging of these two spaces into a singular category—biosensing wearables—is where we see the most potential to impact healthcare. Today there are an overwhelming number of trending wearables, but not all of them are capable of measuring or telling us something about our health. Similarly, there are plenty of biosensors that measure physiological inputs but do not have a wearable form factor. That’s why biosensing wearables are exciting: they allow for continuous physiological monitoring in a wide range of wearable form factors.

Other 1/12/14

Do wearables need their own disruption?

(David Becker/Getty Images)   Digital health came into its own at CES, with 40% more floor space dedicated to the industry this year and a generous collection of health fitness-focused wearables debuting over the course of the week. “If you laid all the wristbands, smart watches, and head-mountable cameras at CES end to end, they would probably run the length of the Las Vegas strip,” said one Guardian reporter. Wearables emerged as one of the six major themes in digital health funding last year, reaching $136 million, according to the 2013 Digital Health Funding Report. IHS Global Insights estimates that the global wearables market will top $30 billion by 2018, a huge leap from $19 billion in 2013.Tech investors, entrepreneurs, and enthusiasts are throwing their hats in the ring as this not-so-new trend in health technology continues to gain traction. But don’t hold your breath just yet. Creators of wearable technologies, particularly biosensors and fitness trackers, still face a huge barrier: convincing consumers that these gadgets are more than a fleeting craze. However, CES unveiled a host of new trends in the wearable space and 2014 may be the year you actually want a smart watch. In a recent survey…

Other 1/12/14

Do wearables need their own disruption?

(David Becker/Getty Images)   Digital health came into its own at CES, with 40% more floor space dedicated to the industry this year and a generous collection of health fitness-focused wearables debuting over the course of the week. “If you laid all the wristbands, smart watches, and head-mountable cameras at CES end to end, they would probably run the length of the Las Vegas strip,” said one Guardian reporter. Wearables emerged as one of the six major themes in digital health funding last year, reaching $136 million, according to the 2013 Digital Health Funding Report. IHS Global Insights estimates that the global wearables market will top $30 billion by 2018, a huge leap from $19 billion in 2013.Tech investors, entrepreneurs, and enthusiasts are throwing their hats in the ring as this not-so-new trend in health technology continues to gain traction. But don’t hold your breath just yet. Creators of wearable technologies, particularly biosensors and fitness trackers, still face a huge barrier: convincing consumers that these gadgets are more than a fleeting craze. However, CES unveiled a host of new trends in the wearable space and 2014 may be the year you actually want a smart watch. In a recent survey…

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