Rock Health News

 

Featured 2/18/15

How laws and policies are shaping telemedicine

The global telemedicine market will reach $36.3B by 2020, and this attractive market is catching the eye of investors and healthcare providers so that one day patients can receive world-class care from anywhere. However, the future of telemedicine is dependent on reimbursement and regulatory policies both at the federal and state level. Here’s how, and why reform is shaping the telemedicine market.

Featured 2/18/15

How laws and policies are shaping telemedicine

The global telemedicine market will reach $36.3B by 2020, and this attractive market is catching the eye of investors and healthcare providers so that one day patients can receive world-class care from anywhere. However, the future of telemedicine is dependent on reimbursement and regulatory policies both at the federal and state level. Here’s how, and why reform is shaping the telemedicine market.

Other 11/12/14

Why virtual pharmacists could bridge the healthcare provider gap

Pharmacists are the most underutilized healthcare provider. Roby Miller, founder of Rock Health portfolio company TelePharm weighed in on the future of telemedicine and how virtual pharmacists, are fitting into the health tech conversation today. Like many of us, Roby knows that the word “telemedicine” is becoming the word in the health tech industry. But what does telemedicine mean to most people? It has been Roby’s experience that “when people hear the term, they think of a video chat between a provider and a patient.” And when most people hear the word ‘provider’, they think of the doctor, not the pharmacist. Why? Most of us think of pharmacists as the dispenser of medication—that’s all. But what happens if pharmacists start spending more time counseling patients virtually? “We’ll see a shift in how pharmacists are reimbursed because their value will be realized shortly from a payers’ standpoint,” says Roby.

Other 11/12/14

Why virtual pharmacists could bridge the healthcare provider gap

Pharmacists are the most underutilized healthcare provider. Roby Miller, founder of Rock Health portfolio company TelePharm weighed in on the future of telemedicine and how virtual pharmacists, are fitting into the health tech conversation today. Like many of us, Roby knows that the word “telemedicine” is becoming the word in the health tech industry. But what does telemedicine mean to most people? It has been Roby’s experience that “when people hear the term, they think of a video chat between a provider and a patient.” And when most people hear the word ‘provider’, they think of the doctor, not the pharmacist. Why? Most of us think of pharmacists as the dispenser of medication—that’s all. But what happens if pharmacists start spending more time counseling patients virtually? “We’ll see a shift in how pharmacists are reimbursed because their value will be realized shortly from a payers’ standpoint,” says Roby.

Seven strategies for telehealth to shape the future of healthcare delivery

Holly May is a consultant at Health Advances. The standard medical encounter today is local and synchronous: a healthcare provider and a patient must be in the same place at the same time for healthcare delivery to happen. Telehealth opens a whole new world. It enables remote and asynchronous engagement.  The tip of the telehealth iceberg includes the use of videoconferencing to enable a doctor to conduct virtual “house calls” or connect far away loved ones to an important conversation with a physician. Telehealth holds a lot of promise. But, its potential to improve and streamline healthcare delivery has not been met yet. Dr. Lee Schwamm is the medical director of telehealth at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In this month’s issue of Health Affairs, he sets forth seven critical strategies for the future delivery of healthcare and outlines the opportunity for telehealth in this brave new world.

Seven strategies for telehealth to shape the future of healthcare delivery

Holly May is a consultant at Health Advances. The standard medical encounter today is local and synchronous: a healthcare provider and a patient must be in the same place at the same time for healthcare delivery to happen. Telehealth opens a whole new world. It enables remote and asynchronous engagement.  The tip of the telehealth iceberg includes the use of videoconferencing to enable a doctor to conduct virtual “house calls” or connect far away loved ones to an important conversation with a physician. Telehealth holds a lot of promise. But, its potential to improve and streamline healthcare delivery has not been met yet. Dr. Lee Schwamm is the medical director of telehealth at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In this month’s issue of Health Affairs, he sets forth seven critical strategies for the future delivery of healthcare and outlines the opportunity for telehealth in this brave new world.

×